arcing electricity between a cut insulated copper wire

Ampacity | Info | Faqs | Sitemap

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This site is purely informational. We aim to create a place where people can find out what wire they need and how to use it. Please consult a qualified electrician before installing wire. Please email comments or suggestions to admin@gaugewire.com

 

braided and stranded copper wire showing the small caps that lead to the current rising to the outer surface

Ampacity

Wire is not free flowing.  Even a completely pure copper wire will have natural resistance to current.  When we pull current through electrical wiring, the flow of the electricity against the resistance of the wire makes the wire heat up (friction).  The wire has a temperature that, if reached, will melt the wire down.  We call this wire failure.  In electrical terms, we refer to this threshold or melting point as the ampacity of the wire.  In electrical applications, one of the main questions is how many amps can we put through the wire?  What you may not realize is that the safe amperage means that it is the amount you can put in the wire without melting it down. 

How to Determine Amps  

Most appliances have a sticker on them that shows the amps drawn.  Most residential homes are on 15 or 20 amp circuits.  You can check your breaker to find out.  Then, you simply add up the amps being drawn on the circuit.  Another way to do it is to add up all the watts being used on the circuit and divide by the volts (110 or 220).  The answer will be the resulting amps used.  Here is a link to our home page that has an amperage chart.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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